So, summer in Huntsville has been filled with a lot of Alabama bicentennial love, understandably! (Psst! The Huntsville Museum of Art joined in on those celebrations with a very special bicentennial exhibit only on display for a few more weeks.) But the Museum is also celebrating one of the grooviest time periods known to man.

Over here, we’re throwing it back to the 1960s. The Summer of the ’60s is in full swing with exhibits focused on art from the ‘60s, the Apollo 11 mission, and the Woodstock festival. Here is the rundown of the most far-out exhibits you can come see for yourself!

 

“Peace, Love, Rock & Roll: Elliott Landy’s Woodstock Vision” July 21 – October 13, 2019

Peace, Love, Rock & Roll: Elliott Landy’s Woodstock Vision
Photo by Elliott Landy ©

Step back in time to the iconic Woodstock festival of 1969. Feel the flower crown on your head and the mud beneath your feet… Almost. Through these images from the official festival photographer, Elliott Landy, you can experience what it was like to be part of the transformative concert event of the 60s. Best known for his classic “rock” photographs, Landy was one of the first “music photographers” to be recognized as an “artist.”

His most celebrated works include portraits of Bob Dylan, The Band, Janis Joplin, Van Morrison, Jimi Hendrix, Jim Morrison, and many others. This exhibit will showcase some of those portraits, images from the protests that broke out across the country, and the famous Woodstock photos you know and love.

Want to hear Landy speak about his experience photographing Woodstock? You can! On July 27, 2019, Elliott Landy will be speaking at the Huntsville Museum of Art. After his talk, you have the opportunity to tour the gallery with him and discuss his photography!

Tickets are on sale now!

“Looking at the Collection: Celebrating the 1960s” June 23 – September 29, 2019

Andy Warhol (American, 1928-1987), Moonwalk (Pink), 1987, Silkscreen print (edition of 160), 38×38 in. Museum purchase, funds provided by the Madison County Federation of Women’s Clubs from the 1987 sale of the Steamboat Gothic House.
Andy Warhol (American, 1928-1987), Moonwalk (Pink), 1987, Silkscreen print (edition of 160), 38×38 in. Museum purchase, funds provided by the Madison County Federation of Women’s Clubs from the 1987 sale of the Steamboat Gothic House.

Have you ever wanted to see an Andy Warhol for yourself? Now is your chance! Looking at the Collection: Celebrating the 1960s features a selection of Pop, Minimalist, and Photorealist works from the Museum’s permanent collection, created by the American artists who rose to fame during the decade. Included are works by Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, James Rosenquist, Frank Stella, and Richard Estes. 

 

A New Moon Rises: Views from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera May 19 – August 11, 2019

Copernican Crater, Courtesy NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center/Arizona State University
Copernican Crater, Courtesy NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center/Arizona State University

For those of you who are digging the celebration of the giant leap man took in July 1969, A New Moon Rises: Views from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera is the perfect exhibit for you! This traveling exhibition from the Smithsonian is the closest we land-dwellers will be able to get to the Moon.

These large-scale, high-resolution photographs of the lunar surface were taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera over the last decade. You’ll see the Apollo landing sites, moony mountains and so much more. You can also explore the moon and follow the lunar module tracks for yourself on the interactive element in the gallery!  

Vietnam: The Real War - Photographs from The Associated Press June 5 – October 6, 2019

U.S. Marines move through a landing zone, December 1969. (©AP Photo).
U.S. Marines move through a landing zone, December 1969. (©AP Photo).

It is important to remember the other aspects of the 60s aside from all the love and peace signs. The Vietnam War was a long, costly and divisive conflict that pitted the communist government of North Vietnam against South Vietnam and its principal ally, the United States.

The conflict was intensified by the ongoing Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union. More than 3 million people (including over 58,000 Americans) were killed in the Vietnam War, and more than half of the dead were Vietnamese civilians. Opposition to the war in the United States bitterly divided Americans. This exhibit is an in-depth look at the war, what was lost and how it affected our country. 

You can stay up to date on all the upcoming events and exhibits at the Museum by visiting the website or by following us on social media! 

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